NEWS

Happy Feet

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Think about it. The foot contains 26 bones and 33 joints – plus 126 ligaments, muscles and tendons.

This architectural wonder absorbs a daily beating. Look at simple walking. Only one mile produces an equivalent of 127,000 pounds – to each foot. In a lifetime the average foot travels about 115,000 miles. Wow! And, at times the strike force can be increased to 4 times your body weight.
Will this surprise you? Women are 4 times more prone to foot problems than men.

Here’s the problem? As feet get tired – muscles shorten. In order to return to normal, muscles must relax and recover. Now here’s the killer – chronically shortened muscles develop trigger points. And, muscles containing trigger points are not able to relax – until the trigger points are released. You recognize trigger points as tender knots. Muscles that harbor trigger points are always stiff and often hurt. More stiffness is felt upon rising from sleep. The first few steps are sometimes a real challenge.
Foot muscles balance the arch for a stable foundation. Here, the foot accommodates 3 major support muscles. The above diagram marks the spots for known trigger points in these muscles. But there’s help – read on.

Here’s a solution. To rid these muscles of trigger points takes effort and patience – but it can be done. To start with – make sure the foot is warm. The idea is to simultaneously compress and stretch the affected muscle – until the trigger point is extinguished. And, to do it often enough to activate muscle memory.
Here’s what you do. Roll a golf ball back & forth under the foot – while applying pressure. A rolling pin is a good substitute. Also, a new product made specifically for this procedure is the FootWheel. It can be view at www.TheFootWheel.com. No matter what self-help method you choose – frequency is important. Always start slow and be gentle. Gradually increase pressure until you feel ouch pain. Now ease up. Continue with purposeful pain for about 1 minute. Perform before and after sleep – other times as needed.

Your goal is to no longer feel ouch pain. When this is accomplished you’ll know the thrill of happy feet.

 

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